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Wyoming State Forestry talks about the upcoming fire season

Authorities say this year will be a busier fire season than last year. This is from the latest Forestry meeting on Monday, where the U.S. Forestry Services...
Published: Jun. 6, 2022 at 9:32 PM CDT
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CHEYENNE, Wyo. (Wyoming News Now) - Authorities say this year will be a busier fire season than last year.

This is from the latest Forestry meeting on Monday, where the U.S. Forestry Services, BLM and the Wyoming State Forestry Division were in attendance.

Stating the multi-department predictive services say, Northeastern Wyoming will be above average in fire potential in June and July and the rest of the state will follow from July to September.

”This year, with the way things are stacking up with the drought and the weather predictions, we’re looking at a pretty significant fire season this year. So we’re looking at a lot more large fires than we’ve had in past years,” said Bill Crapser, State Forester, Wyoming State Forestry Divison.

According to the drought monitor, they predict the driest season so far, peaking in July and August.

On average years there are between 900 to 1000 fires.

Last year there were about 960 fires in the state.

This year, fire helicopters, single tanks planes, and forest firefighter crews are starting this week to prepare for the season.

But aging fire crews and low workforce numbers reduce the fighter numbers of the 3500 firefighting volunteers in the state.

The foresty services stated 9 out of 10 forest fires are human started, so they emphasized clearing fuels away from homes and safely using fire starters in outdoor spaces.

“I think it’s absolutely important that every Wyoming citizen take every precaution they can. Protect their homes, make sure the forest fires don’t get out of hand and threaten structures. Do everything they can to make sure they don’t start something,” said Governor Mark Gordon.

State fire resources are shared nationally and allocated to where they are in the greatest need.

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